09.02.2017

Trends from LT17 - Part 2

Trends from LT17 - Part 2

We pick up with part two of our blog looking back at the overarching trends and themes from last week's Learning Technologies show...

The changing role of L&D

Dr Tobias Kiefer, Global Learning Leader Advisory at Ernst & Young Munich, described the role of L&D departments as becoming 'conductors of the orchestra'.

No longer will L&D teams set the whole training agenda, rather the concept of OYOL (Own Your Own Learning) will grow, with learners becoming consumers who create their own curriculum to reach the level they want in the areas they choose.

This idea that employees choose from a menu of learning relevant to them was also advocated by Rachel Kay, Managing Director, Thales Learning and Development.

She identified two types of learners – those who are hungry and self-motivated and those comfortable with the ‘feed me’ culture, who like taking part in scheduled events and training. The aim is to create environments where ‘feed mes’ become ‘hungrys’ with Amazon-style learning menus reflecting the key skills and behaviours the business wants an employee to have. ‘Feed me’ words such as training, trainers and courses have been replaced by talent, performance and coaches to help this.

Both speakers reinforced the point that social learning is everything, and how solutions are generated by talking. This mindset is akin to making the tearoom globally available to let conversations happen organically and for ideas to ‘marinate’.

L&D diagram on a screen at the LT conference

Dr Kiefer believes a target of 70% OYOL is achievable, even in regulated businesses, with L&D providing professional development guidance and acting as curators, challengers, storytellers, economists and data analysts. The role of L&D becomes about moderating, engaging, helping and stimulating new thinking until the critical point where an individual finds the ‘hunger’ and takes ownership of it themselves.

Where does technology fit in?

In the most basic form technology is the great enabler to all this.

What was really interesting was that all the most popular themes of personalisation, social, informal, self-directed learning, collaboration etc, which prevailed at Learning Technologies feature in the Unicorn Learning Ecosphere, launched at the event (you can download the whitepaper here.)

The Unicorn Learning Ecosphere

The Learning Ecosphere looks how the learner-focused world holds great potential to augment and enhance the personal learning experience, but balanced with the fundamental underlying need for an enterprise to define, manage and report on the inevitable core competencies that remain in every business.

Mobile, just-in-time microlearning, mobile delivery, Bring Your Own Device, gamified learning and social media all present a wealth of opportunities through which to really nurture the ‘hunger’ for OYOL in staff, but in complementing, not replacing, the enterprise-focused concerns of governance, risk and compliance, secure platforms, tracking and reporting and mandatory formal assessed learning.

Although the idea of giving staff the choice to do learning where and when they want is high on the list of demands to suppliers now, Rachel Kay raised an interesting point on the moral position of asking employees to engage in learning outside of office hours. She concluded that in reality no one can be forced to work outside their contracted hours, all you can do is provide such diverse, appetizing learning menu to try to create the hunger in people to start picking at it themselves.

When it comes to fostering social learning she also identified the power of WhatsApp in creating informal discussion groups where some of the best learning and knowledge sharing takes place.

Last year games were the Learning Technologies hot topic. This year it felt like people had moved from not quite being sure where games could fit into a learning programme but being mildly intrigued, to now seeing their value and looking at whether actually introducing elements of gamified learning might be right for them.

Could the same level of recognition towards personalisation and learner-led learning be evident by Learning Technologies 2018? Time will tell…

Subscribe to the Unicorn newsletter for the latest updates

Please complete missing fields or check information is correct.

Contact Us

Please complete missing fields or check information is correct.